Episode 27: Jose Galvan How to start your own Podcast and Youtube Channels

Episode Description: In this episode, we get to know who Jose is and the work he does with starting this channel. We dive into setting up, notes you should take on projects, and the hurdles of applying your podcast to sites.

 

Resources:

Personal Website – thegnsubspace.com

LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/joseemiliogalvan/

Email – emilio@thegnsubpsace.com or jegalvan136@gmail.com

 

Posh Incredible Transformations – https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/posh-incredible-transformations/id1377517663?mt=2

Youtube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyrz1fZpMDHSfGm7t29ieOA/featured

Website – Poshinc.com

Email – tifany@poshinc.com

 

Episode Notes:

  • Intro – 0:00
  • Did You Enjoy Your Lunch? – 0:06
  • Show Guest Intro – 0:16
  • Guests With Mic Placement and Recording – 0:25
  • Welcome to the Podcast – 3:42
  • What Jose Does – 3:53
  • When I Gave You This Project, Was It Intimidating? – 4:54
  • I’m Paying Jose to Watch Me Be a Weirdo – 6:22
  • I Have a Hard Time Managing People – 6:40
  • Jose Is Always Looking to Improve – 7:30
  • What Difficulties Did You Come Across? – 8:45
  • Look Out for Your Transitions – 11:13
  • Working Remotely From Different Locations – 11:33
  • I Can Be Very Meticulous – 12:07
  • Nobody Is Gonna Listen to the First Episodes – 12:32
  • It’s Been a Learning Step – 13:03
  • The Hurdles with Application Process – 13:52
  • Zoom Recording Settings – 18:18
  • What Is Your Setup? – 19:11
  • What You Need When Starting a Podcast – 21:32
  • Preferred Audio Settings – 22:49
  • Understanding Quality – 23:50
  • Going Over the Specifics – 29:53
  • Optimization Is New To Me – 30:48
  • Knowing Things Makes You Appreciate Quality – 33:14
  • Procrastinating to Be Perfect – 34:55
  • Being to Myself – 36:35
  • Anything Else You Want to Share? – 38:47
  • Preferred Time Of Day to Work – 43:55
  • Closing/Last Thoughts – 45:08

Tiffany: Hi guys, welcome back to “Posh Incredible Transformations Podcast.” This is an interview segment where I have a casual conversation with somebody who has done exactly the type of thing that you have been dreaming of doing. We lay it down straight, we get into the nitty-gritty, we ask really in-depth questions. So you can, kind of, lay your own roadmap and use our experiences and mindset for making the decision. You get to see what the grass is like on the other side of the hill, or the road, or on the other side of, fill in the blank. Anyways, in this interview, I interview a very special guest. His name is Jose Galvan. And he has been working with us. Yes, he is one of our own. He’s been working with us off and on for, I don’t know, since 2013, since we did Outpost. If you want to find out more about Outpost, there is a podcast about it where I am interviewed by a group of UCLA students trying to devise a business plan for bottling cold brew. Anyways, more about that in the show notes below, but let’s talk about Jose. Jose has been working with us on bottling, and distributing, and warehousing, and a bunch of stuff that Jose is not really passionate about, and we love him for that. But we’re all working remotely now. And Jose’s passion, and what he is schooled in, and what he educates himself in on the daily is technology, more specifically audio editing, video editing, and basically, anything electronic like photography. We did a podcast together, and also on YouTube about how to set up your camera settings for recording YouTube videos. Check that out, we’ll leave it in the notes below. But one of the most special things about Jose is, he is always looking to improve things. And one of the things that I love about him is, I mean, even when he was working in the warehouse, he would say things to us like, “There’s an issue with this, we need to do X, Y, and Z about it.” Or, “I already took the initiative to do that.” And Jose has done that with this podcast. So everything you listen to, everything you watch, this is Jose’s creation. I’m just creating the content. I put it on over to Jose and he does everything. So this interview is about how he does that. So basically, I said, “Jose, I want to start a podcast, can you let me know how? Like, what do we need to do, can you get on it, please?” And basically, he came back to me and said, “Okay, this is what we need to do. This is what I need from you. This is, like, the artwork we need.” And he, kind of, laid it all out for me. And I said, “Great, I’m working for you now. You’re my boss, you tell me what you need.” And he got the podcast up and running, he got it on iTunes. He has applied for multiple platforms. He does the posting, he does all of the video editing. So after we got the podcast up and rolling, I said, “All right, Jose, I’m going to give you another project. We’re going to start doing videos.” And he’s like, “I think that’s a great idea.” And he was excited about it. And so I was like, “All right, this is what we’re going to do, I’m going to give you this.” And I set up a system, and we, kind of, talk about the system through this interview, and he does the editing. So in this interview, you will find Jose’s editing process, you’ll find out what it takes to start a podcast, what you need to do on the back end. There’s a lot of information about the equipment that you need, and how to interview, and how to take notes. But not a whole lot of people… And I’ve actually not heard of any podcast or… And I’m sure there’s one out there, or YouTube channel that tells you all the backend work that needs to go into it before you can even, like, apply for iTunes or Spotify. And since this is Jose’s project, I wanted to interview him and make this information available. And we’re probably going to do a part two, or a part three. And yeah, anyways, Jose is great. He also does this work for other clients, so if you need to get a hold of him, leave a comment below or email us. You can email me, tiffany@poshinc.com, and we can get you set up with Jose. Anyways, without further ado, I hope you guys enjoy this interview with Jose, and me. Thank you so much for watching and tuning in. Tiffany: Hey. Jose: Hi. Tiffany: How’s it going? How was your lunch? How’s your falafel sandwich? Jose: It was delicious. Tiffany: Yeah, I mean, oh my gosh, I was so flipping hungry. No, the mic is here. Jose: Yeah. Or I can just hold it, too. Tiffany: If you want. Jose: I’m not that special. Tiffany: If you want to hold it, you can hold it. But what I’ve found is usually guests move around a lot… Jose: Yeah, I do. Tiffany: …and they’re not cognizant of what they’re doing with their hands. And so that’s why I give the guest the stand, because I know that I shouldn’t move this around because it makes noise. Jose: It’s true. Tiffany: In the recording, you hear it, right? Jose: I do. Tiffany: When people move the mics. Jose: It was just really funny because when I would hear that, I would think it was actually the guest, but I realize now that it is you, because you’re the only one holding the mic. Tiffany: Well, I mean, no. When I do it, it is usually the guests. Jose: Okay. Okay. Tiffany: Because this is the first time that I brought the stand because I know… Usually, when I do interviews, it’s either with the mic on the cam or before, I had this, but I did this single one, right? Jose: Uh-huh. Tiffany: And that’s not good. Jose: No. Tiffany: So now that I have the two mics and stuff, like… Jose: It works a lot better. Tiffany: …it’s better to bring the stand so the thing doesn’t move. Jose: Yeah, because that was the problem before, because when you would use just this, you don’t know, like, who was, like, really hogging up like a portion of the mic. So sometimes, like, you’d be loud, the other person wouldn’t be loud. So it’d be confusing sometimes. And it’s only one file, but like this, it’s two files. So if this person is, like, is too quiet, then I can always just raise up the volume on their end. Tiffany: That’s actually a really good tip for folks who are listening. We kind of just started this because, like, we are testing the sound. And when we test the sound, usually that already enters the conversation, and that’s how it happened. So what we’re talking about is we’re using the Zoom H2 recorder. And the Zoom comes with a mic, but Jose found it difficult to edit with a single mic because when two people are talking, their sounds aren’t exactly matched. So in the recording, it’s hard to get them matched because they didn’t start matched. Now when you record with two different mics, like Jose, when he’s editing, he could bring one person’s level up to match the other one, or reduce the other person’s level to match the person who is softer or not as loud. And so that’s what Jose was saying, like, something that we’ve learned is that we just need two mics. People need to have their own mics. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: Unless, like, I have started using the camera with the… What is that mic called? Jose: The Rode. Tiffany: The Rode. So in that case, what would happen? Like if we’re doing this on the big camera with the Rode… Jose: I should just keep it on one point because when you have it on the actual top of the camera, it’s just focused into a certain level that’s just, whenever someone’s talking, that’s it. I mean, sure, if someone gets loud they’re going to get loud, but with the mic, it’s just like one side, one section. So it’s like if I’m moving this way, it’s probably going to be picked up. It’s, like, it sounds pretty off. But if I’m right in front of the mic, then you can hear it clear. Tiffany: It would be cool if you didn’t edit that so people can hear if you didn’t edit that out. Okay. So anyways, welcome to the podcast. Jose: Thank you. Tiffany: This is really interesting because I haven’t really heard of anybody interviewing their own, like, back end or back of house… Jose: That’s true. Tiffany: …podcasts. So what Jose does is, and I’ll give you an intro just like I give everybody else. But Jose is the person behind the scenes. He, like, makes everything happen. He makes everything work. He does the editing, he does the music, he does the mixing. He does, like, everything, Jose, like, the videos and the audio. And so I really wanted to get into Jose’s head, because he is the one that’s hit all of the bumps in the road in terms of trying to figure out how to get this podcast up and running, or how to get the video…the YouTubes up and running. And while he’s figuring that out, I’m figuring out how to be better for you guys to look at. But Jose is the one that’s doing all, like, you know, the really, really, really hard work. And so, I’m sure a lot of people want to start podcasts, want to start YouTubes, and it’s, kind of, intimidating. Like, when I gave you this project, was it intimidating? Jose: It was because, I mean, when you work on personal stuff, you already know what you personally want to do. But when you work on something like this, it’s someone else’s project. I mean Tiffany has given me like creative control on what to do with the videos and the podcasts. So usually like in previous work, they’ll give you like a task sheet, and that task sheet will tell you, “This is what I want you to do exactly.” Like pinpoint, pinpoint. Like from that certain time point where they want you to edit, where they want you to cut. So, like, this is always fun. Like when someone says to you, “All right, do whatever you want.” Cool, that’s always great. But with this type of thing, it’s like I only know you to a certain level. So you’re telling me, “Do what you want to do.” Like, “Do what you can do with it.” It’s like, “Here’s the work, like, go for it. Have fun.” Then it’s like, “Okay, what can I do that I know that she’s going to be happy with, that she can love?” So this experience has been awesome because I’ve gotten to know you a lot more than I previously had. And it’s, kind of, weird because Tiffany always does these, especially the videos, because the videos, she always does sees these silly things just to warm up. So it, kind of, like makes me feel like better. Like makes me feel, like, makes me feel like, “All right, cool.” Like, I know what I’ve got to do now. Like, I know what I can use, what I have to cut out, and like get me like pumped up. Like that gets me pumped up to know, like, “All right, I’m working right now. This is what I’m doing.” Like, “We’re good to go.” Tiffany: I literally…like, what runs through my head when I’m doing those is, “I’m paying Jose to watch me be a weirdo right now.” But you have to. So I guess one thing is, like, I like… One, I think I said this in the podcast with Oz, it’s, I have a hard time managing people. I want people to do what they do best, which is why I brought Jose in for this project. Jose used to work in our warehouse. He was, like, our warehouse manager. And he’s, like, probably one of the best, easiest people that I’ve ever worked with. And I know that he loves the video. I know that he loves the audio stuff. Like he’s the music guy. He was always, you know, like editing videos in his free time, like working on his projects. He went to school while he was working with us to, like, finish his degree in, like, what is it, video editing? Jose: Oh, this time around it was for audio engineering. Tiffany: Audio engineering. Jose: Yeah. I studied film-making before that, and I just love music so much and I thought, like, “Well, you know, I should really polish up my skills and just do that as… What else should I do, you know, just to keep myself busy?” Tiffany: So this is what I love about Jose. He’s always looking to improve. So I knew that you did video stuff. I didn’t know about the audio stuff, but obviously, you’re qualified to do this. And I know that is what you enjoy doing. So it’s like when I know that, I don’t want to micromanage you. I don’t want to tell you what to cut, like when to cut. And I do sometimes. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: Like, “Yo, we’ve got to cut this out.” But for the most part, also, I wanted to see where you were starting, what your starting point was. Jose: Oh, okay. Tiffany: How much direction you actually needed. Because I don’t want to, like, lay it all on you mostly because I know you. We’ve developed, like, a relationship in work over the past, like what? Like three years. Jose: Three years? Tiffany: You know, Outpost. Jose: Oh yeah. Tiffany: You were working with us in Outpost. Jose: I was. Yeah, that’s how I started. Tiffany: That was back in 2014. Jose: Probably it was 2014 then. Yeah, because that’s how I came in. Tiffany: Yeah. Jose: Because of Outpost, so… Tiffany: So you’ve actually worked on three different things with us. So I know him work-wise. I know what he is capable of, I know how he works. So there’s a development of trust there, and that’s why I gave you so much and the way that I gave it to you. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: But like what difficulties did you come across? Like, let’s go with the podcast first, because that’s where we started. I really put a lot on Jose. I was like, “Hey, we’re going to start a podcast.” I asked you to register our business. I gave you a bunch of content to edit. He had no idea what he was editing. He did the music and he put it all together and he also does the posts. So that’s a lot of work. And then I put the videos on him. So, like, once we got that rolling, the podcast rolling was after what? Probably like four or five episodes, right? Jose: Correct. Yeah. Tiffany: Then I was like, “All right, here. Let’s do video now.” Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: And then that was, like, a whole another thing that we had to get up and running. But let’s talk about the podcast first since it came first. Jose: Sure. Tiffany: Like, what were your biggest hurdles? What were the things that you learned the most? Like, that would make your life easier now if you had to do it again. Jose: Well, I mean I think you’ve asked me a couple of times, too. Like directions to on my end, to see like, “Oh, what do you need to do better?” Like, “How should you use the mic better? How should you fix it in parts of the recording device itself?” So one of the biggest things that I never really thought about that I really have to go in depth was, when it comes to editing the podcast, there’s a lot of parts… Or I didn’t mean that. I guess it’s normal for everyone to be like, okay, when you’re doing an interview, you’re always going to have these words that you always say, “Um.” The “um” is a big thing that you’re going to say. So at the very beginning of those episodes, there was a lot of quiet moments but a lot of, “Um…” And so it’s like, but then you’ll dive right into, like, the conversation that we were just having. Because it sounded like you were thinking of that question. Trying to go back into your head and think, like, “What was I about to ask right now?” So that was always difficult at the beginning, because yeah, I had to learn that I had to cut so much. So a lot of time was spent on like, “Okay, I got to take out these.” Especially because, you know, if they sound natural, sure, I’ll leave a couple of them. But otherwise that episode would just be “um” left and right, like, every other minute. So that was always, like, a difficult part because I’d have to, like, really go in there. And especially when the “um” would probably be so long that it comes into the question, I’d have to, like, really get in to it like a magnifying glass and just, like, split it where it sounds like that never happened. Tiffany: Okay. So if you’re looking to do audio and podcasting, then pay attention to your own, I guess, transition words and how you use them. And a pause would be better because it would make it easier for your editor to do that. If you’re doing your own editing, it would make it easier for you, too. Jose: Of course. And I think the other part was because we were working… And it’s not like we were working in the same room, like, we were working remotely, so that’s… Tiffany: I was in a different country. Jose: Yeah. So it’d be difficult to just be like, “Hey, Tiffany, like, you messed up right here. Can we like do this all over again at this moment?” Like that’s the difference. Like right now what we’re doing here, it’s like, “Oh yeah, sure.” We can be like, “All right, let’s do another take.” Like, because I already know it might come out right in the episode, but at that moment, at the beginning, that’s what was the difficult part, because it’s like, all right, I got to work into this because it is what I got. There’s no, like, re-dos right here, so I’ve got to work the best that I can to make this sound good. Tiffany: Yeah. You’re also very meticulous about things, though. Jose: Yeah, yeah. Tiffany: I would probably, like, not spend the time. And you, like, really get in there. You’re like, “No, I have to make this like the best…” Jose: Yeah, definitely. Tiffany: “…that it can be.” Jose: I am definitely like that. I’m very, very meticulous. Like, I want to make sure everything is perfect. And I know things can’t always be perfect, but I try to do my best to what it seems to be at least decent. Tiffany: But that’s also in the Oz’s episode. That’s why one of the things that I realized before I started making content that you didn’t realize was that, nobody is going to listen to the first episodes. Jose: Yeah, sure. Tiffany: You just have to get the ball rolling. I think Jose spent like, you know, really long time editing the episodes that, you know, they’re just, like, let’s call those warm-up episodes. Even though there’s like great content, I may end up redoing that content again, just because, you know, we had to start somewhere. Jose: It’s a learning step through everything, through this whole process of what we were being working on together because it’s true. Like, now we’ve come to a realization where it’s like, “Oh yeah. Who really might be watching or listening to this stuff? So it doesn’t have to be completely perfect or that great.” So… Tiffany: What other things have you learned along the way that would have helped you like either do it faster, do it better, or, like, what other sticking points where there that, like, major world learning opportunities or learning curves, hurdles that you had to go through? What about with, like, the applications? Jose: Okay. The applications. I mean, well, because the applications are something I already do know that I work on so that was… It had been a while though, so I felt like at the beginning I was warming up into the application that I was using to edit the podcasts. But I feel like it’s been something interesting too because I never had to apply it for our podcast to be set up, so that was new. Like I’ve always had that interest for my own personal work, but I’ve never done it. So this was great to actually do all of this because I was able to learn a lot to it. So as much as it took me some time, it’s like now I know how to do all that stuff to just easily come about for whatever reason I always think to set up some other show or something or… Tiffany: What was the most difficult part about the applications? Was it just having all of the information? Jose: Yes, because a lot of applications, they want you to be very particular. Like, you need to have everything set up like all ready to go. Like, you need to have your artwork, there needs to be to a specific type of size for the artwork. Obviously, having them in your show. You kind of have to have a lot of metadata. So you had to have also a description of your show, and you have to have… You already had to have a certain amount of episodes, so even though it took us time for those first couple of episodes, like, I had to dump all of that all at once. It couldn’t just be, like, one episode. You could, but then it’s like, I’m assuming from what I read, it’s like they’ll listen to it and see like, “All right, you know, you’re qualified, but if you have so many episodes, just to dump on there.” It’s like, “Okay, cool.” The legit one I have, a podcast show, so they’re going to be consistent. Tiffany: So the major thing is just to make content? Jose: Make content. That’s pretty much it. And I think because we’re still trying to set up for Spotify, and like I mentioned before, it’s like Spotify, they’re very particular because they have like a large base of people who just want to start a show. Everyone wants to go on Spotify, because everyone uses Spotify, everyone listens to Spotify. So it’s just much more difficult for you to get into it. Actually, from what I read, it’s supposed to take about three months just to, hopefully, get approved. And it’s not like they’re going to email you saying, “Hey, you’re on Spotify now.” You’ll just show up, like, you’ll just pop up on their Spotify servers. And then like, there, that’s it. But for them it seems like you actually need to have, like, a following base. Like, you need to actually have a certain amount of, like, a bunch of episodes. Unless again, like you know somebody that can get you in, then I guess they make it easy on you. But… Tiffany: So if you’re thinking about starting a podcast, just start. Jose: Yeah, definitely. Tiffany: Don’t worry about the application. Like, make a few episodes and then from there, like, the application sounds pretty easy. Jose: Yeah. And then another thing is too, that a lot of the… Well, like, I know with Apple podcasts and, like, Google Play, they’ll take you in, and they say that you need to be active. Like you need to consistently be like dropping episodes. They’re not specific, whether it’s like every week, every day, every month, they’re just saying you should just be active. And that’s the other bad part about Spotify, too. It’s, like, you really have to be active. If you’re not active, it’s possibly they can just, like, bump you out. Tiffany: Okay. So just because you get on Spotify doesn’t mean you’ll stay there? Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: Is that what you’re saying? Jose: Yeah, exactly. Tiffany: Yeah. That makes sense. Jose: I mean, we’re still waiting on that, so it’s like, once we get on that, I guess we’ll see how that really works. But at least from what I read on their own, like, on their back-end, that’s how it is, so… Tiffany: And then what other platforms are we on? Jose: Stitcher. Tiffany: Stitcher? Okay. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: And was that similar to like iTunes? Jose: That one was actually a little bit more, I guess, in a professional sense, like more clean in that you actually had to submit an application. Like a legit application saying we have to have a website already. You have to have certain amount of episodes. Then, you did have to wait for an email to actually get approved. Tiffany: Okay. Jose: So, yeah, that actually took a little bit more time. But still, I mean we got in, but yeah, it took time. Versus Apple was all inclusive, like you just drop everything in there, and that’s pretty much it. Actually, they have like a little status bar to to show you like, “Oh hey, you’re approved or not.” Or like when your application is rolling, so… Tiffany: That’s cool. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: And then there’s also some Zoom settings, right? Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: Do we go over that in a video or anything? Jose: No, we never have actually. Tiffany: So, Jose will walk you through how to set up your Zoom. So, like, it’s for what program? Like, what are your tools? Jose: Well, okay. For me, for this, the way how this works, obviously you choose the audio file that you want. So majority of the time, we always just trying to save it as, like, a WAV file, W-A-V file, because it’s pretty universal. Like any application you use will take it. And a lot of times it just depends on like what ecosystem you have. Is it Apple or is it Mac…sorry, Microsoft? Because there is always another file format that you can save. It’s called AIFF. That one always saves a lot of like metadata information. It makes it a lot more easier on you, too, like, if you save everything correctly, like, when you dump it into like the computer, it’s pretty much like all there. But we usually use WAV just because it’s more universal. Tiffany: It’s universal. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: So tell us what your setup is. Like, what do you use for editing and all of that stuff? Like music, audio, video editing. And then we’ll go through, like, Zoom settings, and then we’ll go through camera settings. Jose: Okay. Tiffany: No, we won’t go through camera settings because we already did a video on that. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: So we’ll go through Zoom settings. Jose: Okay. Zoom settings. Tiffany: No, no. Like, what do you use? Jose: What do I use? Tiffany: Tell us all your tools. Jose: All my tools? Tiffany: Yeah. What do you use for editing? Jose: Oh, like the programs? Tiffany: Like for creating, yeah. Jose: Oh, okay. Well I usually use Final Cut Pro X. Tiffany: What would you call these tools that you use? Programs? Jose: Yeah. Programs. Yeah. Tiffany: So when you’re talking to your editor… When you’re talking to your… What did Oz call you? Jose: What did he call me? Tiffany: Producer. Jose: Producer. Yeah. Tiffany: When you’re talking to your producer, don’t call things tools, call them programs. What programs do you use, producer? Jose: I usually just use Final Cut Pro X for video editing. I usually do also use [inaudible 00:20:23]. Tiffany: What about for audio? Jose: For audio, I use Logic Pro. Tiffany: Okay. Jose: Logic Pro X also. Tiffany: And then on a daily basis when you’re doing work, like for us, what are you using? What tools do you use? Jose: Well, Tiffany, those are the programs I use with our project right now. Like, normally I would use ProTools for audio stuff. Our business of, like, making music also for the show, it just makes it a lot more easier to use like Logic Pro, just because… I mean, when I was in New York and I was making all that stuff at first, I didn’t have like my guitar, like my bass. Like I had a keyboard, that’s it. So it’s just more, everything is more inclusive with, like, Logic was what I had there. Like it already has, like, its own little sound programs in there, there are instrumental programs. So it was easy for me to just, like, click, use whatever, and then apply it to whatever episode I’m currently working on. Tiffany: Okay. Also, Jose… Now, I’m self-conscious of all of my “ums.” Jose, so when you do a podcast, you’re going to need an intro. So either that is an intro to the podcast, a description, and you’re going to need… Like, if you’re interviewing, you’ll need like an intro for the interview, either the person that you’re interviewing. And then I started off with a list of questions, but I’ve kind of gone to having an intention of who I want to interview, and then what I want to get out of it or what I want…not me personally, but like what I want to bring out of it. And then I, kind of, go with the flow through the interview and questions. And then an outro, that could be like a sign-off or something. And then a description in the show notes. So what Jose does is, when he’s editing, he’ll make a list of all of the things that we talk about over the interview, and then he’ll timestamp them, and then put links to anything below. So he does all the posting and descriptions and stuff. And what else did we have to figure out together? There were a lot of things that we’ve like gone back and forth about like, there was the camera stuff, there was the Zoom settings. Do you want me to go over your Zoom settings now? Jose: Yeah, sure. I mean, it depends on what you working on, but if you’re trying to start the podcast recordings, it usually is best to set it at a 44.1 kHertz. That’s, like, the recording format you’re going to want to have it on versus the file formatting, which is WAV, because it’s just the standard way to go when you’re going to like stream audio anywhere. But when it comes to video though, it works a little bit more differently. You usually end up going towards a 48… I think I told you what it was. Yeah, 48 kHertz. It’s just the way how we were taught. Tiffany: That’s funny. Okay. So before I got the Rode mic, I was using the Zoom to record audio, while I was using the camera to record video. And if you’re going to match the audio and the video that way, then you need to the settings on the Zoom to 48. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: What’s the difference in the sound? Jose: Okay. Well, the higher you actually go, the more information you actually are recording. Like it’s… How can I explain it? Tiffany: So it picks up more? Jose: For example, okay, a picture. If you take a standard definition picture versus a high definition picture, which is a lot better? Tiffany: High def. Jose: Exactly, the high definition picture. So the higher you actually go with the actual recording format, the more information you get out of the recording. How can I explain that more? There is just more detailed information on the sound waves that you get, so… Tiffany: How does that interpret audio? Jose: Okay. So when we actually… Once we’re done with, like, the audio project, whatever podcast episode that we we’re done, usually you have to save that. So what I usually have to do is, I still save it as a WAV file and it’s still at that high-resolution format. But it has to downsize to an MP3 format. So then when I downsize into an MP3 format, it starts to lose all this information. So if a symbol is like a certain way, how it sounds much more cleaner… Tiffany: Oh. Jose: …then when it starts to downsize, that symbol doesn’t sound… Tiffany: It’s distorted. Jose: It’s distorted. Tiffany: See, this is a really good thing to know. So 44 is safe? Jose: Yeah. I mean you can honestly go higher if you want to. The only reason why we will try to keep it that way is because, well, how long do you think you’re going to be working…I’d be working on this, like, episode? Like, it just depends on your memory settings. Like, if you’re memory card only has a certain way amount of, like, space in it, then that’s the reason why I will keep it. Like that’s the standard for you to keep it up, for you to record it, but you can go a lot more higher if you want. It’s like when I do my work from home, like when I actually work on my own music, if I have to record stuff, I actually go at 96. That’s like three times…no, two times…yeah, two times. Tiffany: Two. Yeah. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: Okay, why? Jose: Just because you’re really ever going to record the best that you can from that audio format. So then when you keep going down, again, once you go down, like, when you do it to an MP3 format, it’ll probably sound just really clean. And it’s a very interesting thing that a lot of people sometimes… Obviously, if you didn’t really study it or you’re not into the whole recording aspects of making music and stuff, you start to learn. That’s why there is a whole debate on Apple Music because Apple has this thing of, “Oh, you can download their stuff on, like, iTunes Plus.” Because it’s a higher quality standard where it’ll sound like it’s coming out a CD, but yet it’s in an MP3 file format. Tiffany: Oh, interesting. Jose: Yeah, that’s why a lot of people always say this all the time. If you talk to old school people who are into CD collecting and all that stuff, that’s why all for them stick to their CDs too because you get, like, the best audio quality out of a CD. You still can now, not that you can’t. You can totally get the best audio quality from digital. It’s just, you have to obviously download it to that file size. And usually, like a full file size for like a 3-minute song or something like that could be maybe about over a gigabyte versus like 30 megabytes or something. Tiffany: Yeah. Does Tidal do that, too? Jose: Yeah. Actually, that’s what Tidal was like trying to focus on. They were trying to make it seem… HiFi is what they will call it for like the HiFi people who want high fidelity in their audio. So that’s what their whole spiel was, is that like, “Hey, we’re not sure we’re like other streaming service company, but we have the HiFi where it’s like at the high def.” Tiffany: Yeah. Jose: So that’s what they usually do. Tiffany: I mean, I don’t know if I can tell the difference, but I can definitely get my dose of Jay Z on Tidal, and I can’t do that anywhere else, so… Jose: Yeah. I mean, sure. I mean, like there’s a lot of people who go, like, really with all that kind of stuff. Like sure, “We can just have a simple set of, like, Apple headphones or just some Beats and we can probably…” I mean, if you listen to that kind of stuff a lot, you’ll be able to tell it, but if you’re just like, “I don’t care. Like I just want to listen to music.” But it’s not going to come… Like, you can’t tell so much of a difference unless someone tells you like, “Hey, listen to this one and then listen to this one, and tell me, like, which one sounds better?” But again, people sometimes even spend, like, a crapload of money just to have better headphones that aren’t going to give you that experience that you want. Amplifiers, speakers, like different things, so… Tiffany: Yeah. Actually, I can tell the difference in headphones. Jose: Okay. Tiffany: I just can’t tell the difference in apps. Jose: Oh, okay. Yeah. See that’s the other thing, too. Here’s another thing that you probably should know because sometimes a lot of these apps, you need to switch your settings, too. Tiffany: What? Jose: Yeah. Sometimes you do. Like, Spotify, for a while… Tiffany: Okay, so, like, what would the settings be? Jose: Like, for Spotify before, like you actually had to go into your audio playback settings and they’ll tell you the different types of MP3 formats you can listen to. So it’d be like 128… Tiffany: In your computer or in your phone? Jose: In your phone. Tiffany: There are audio playback settings in the phone? Jose: Yeah. Every app that you use will have its own little settings, so you have to actually go into it and tweak them. So it’s like Tidal. Like, from what I remember, you do have to switch those settings, too. Like, if you pay for that HiFi subscription, then you have to turn it on and be, like, “This is the format I want to listen to it in.” Tiffany: All right, after we’re done with this, I’ll drive me home, while you change my settings, because I had no idea you can even change your audio settings in your phone. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: That’s crazy. Okay, let’s go over just a couple of things. So if you’re going to hire someone, be very specific about how you want your editing done. I didn’t do that with Jose because I’ve worked with Jose before and I know he’s, like sort of, on the same wavelength. Jose: Mm-hmm. Tiffany: Like, we’re not on the same wavelength, but you’re on… Like, you know what you’re doing because you’ve done this for so long and it’s because, like, your heart’s there. And so, like, that’s why I trust you, but if you’re going to hire somebody to do your work and it’s not Jose, then you have to be… I’m hiring people to do like the SEO stuff and the optimization for YouTubes and descriptions. And as I’m talking to people, really not everyone is ready to be there and understand exactly what you want and need. They need to be told what to do. Jose: Yeah. I mean, it’s like, this stuff now, too, with the whole optimization thing. Like, it’s all new to me. I mean, I’m learning from you. Like, you’re giving me the definition of, like, “Hey, this is how you do it. This is how it’s done.” So I mean, it’s always been interesting, too. It’s just the fact like that it’s this whole project has been, like, a learning step, too. As much as the stuff that I know, but the other things I don’t know, like, I’m learning. So it’s like, “Hey, I know…” I can’t say, like, I’m, like, the best to do that specifically, but, “Hey, I’m learning something new, and it’s just like a new skill.” Tiffany: Yeah. I think in terms of optimization, I think it’s more of, like, the way that I look at it is, it’s a way of thinking because you just have to think about what other people are searching for so you could be there to capture them, or you could be there when they search, when the search engine comes up, you know? That’s how I think about optimization. I wouldn’t say, “I guess it’s just trying to figure out what other people are looking for.” Jose: It’s just very interesting to know, because, like, you think, like, “Oh yeah, just search something online.” And it pumps up, so it’s like, “Oh cool. It’s just there.” But you don’t really think and realize, “Oh well, there’s steps taken from these websites or these people are doing that for them to be, like, at the top of the list.” So it’s another… Tiffany: You’re seeing it from a different perspective. Jose: Yeah, yeah. I’m just seeing it from a different perspective. Tiffany: Not only from, like, a searcher’s perspective, but you’re seeing it from the other side. Jose: Yeah, exactly. Tiffany: Yeah. I actually think that’s valuable information to be able to have in general, to see things from a new perspective. Jose: It does. Because now once you learn that, that’s it. It’s, like, every day you do something like that, whenever you go back to doing that, it’s like that’s the way you see it. So it’s like, yeah, if I search for something, it’s, like, “Okay, let me see. Let me look into more details about that.” So, it’s like, there’s a lot of things that I feel like for me personally, it conflicts with my daily life. Not in a bad way, but it’s, for example, yeah, when I finished off the whole audio engineering program, it’s, like, that came more into a thing where it’s like, “Okay, I pay attention a lot more movies.” Like if I’m watching a movie, it’s like, “Oh, they made a mistake right there,” or, “That sound doesn’t sound right.” I know that that’s probably how they did it. Sometimes you ruin things for other people, especially if you’re talking out loud, you know? Tiffany: I know exactly what you mean. Knowing things makes you appreciate really good quality thoughtful things, right? Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: Because when you see something and you can also see the underside of it, like the work that went into it, and the thought that went into it, you really appreciate it. Jose: Oh, for sure. Yes. Tiffany: You’re automatically just like pulled to it. You’re like, “That’s good stuff.” You know, there’s not a whole lot of good, like, things out there. Jose: No. I mean, for example, for me, since I’m a whole movie guy, that’s why when a lot of people will say, “Oh this movie was terrible. It was bad.” It’s like, “I don’t know.” I read a lot of critic reviews, especially also like on Rotten Tomatoes, but just because something is fresh stamped doesn’t mean I’m probably going to love it or I’m going to be like, “Okay, cool. Like, this is the best movie ever.” Like, even if something is that terribly bad, I’ll watch it because I want to give them the benefit of the doubt because, yeah, they put the work into it and, you know, you might not know what their whole, like, point of what they were working on was supposed to be, so… Tiffany: Yeah. Another reason why I’m also so hard on myself and it’s hard to put out content that I also sometimes know isn’t that full, like, range of quality that I appreciate, but, you know, at the same time, it’s like it takes a lot to get to that point. And, you know, you and I both appreciate, like, good quality stuff, and it’s, like, we’re just aiming to be that every single time, you know? Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: Or aiming to be a little closer to it every single time. Jose: Yes. Tiffany: Yeah. But it’s tough also for people like us because it’s tough to start something knowing that it won’t be there when we start, right? Jose: Yes. And that’s a good way to put things. That sometimes, for me being, again, meticulous, I, for years, would always feel, like, “Oh, I need to have this equipment, this is exact item. I need to have this exact program. I need to be in this mindset.” Sometimes you just have to tell yourself, like, “No, just do it. Just go for it. Work with what you have.” Tiffany: Yeah. I love that. Jose: So… Tiffany: Work with what you have. And if you really need something more later down the road, like get it. Jose: Yeah, exactly. Then, again, you don’t know who’s going to listen or watch your content, but either way it’s a practice. It’s a practice for you to improve on your own self. So if you just want to do something, you just have to go over it. I mean sometimes I feel like you have to be in the right mindset just to do it because that’s the only way how you can feel you can do it, but you just need that extra push from somebody to just be like, “No, go for it and do it.” Because once you do it, you’re in there, you’re good. Like, you can go from there. Tiffany: Yeah. I think, along the same lines, I think it’s good to commit to doing it more than once, too. Jose: True. Yeah. Tiffany: Because you could go do it and then fail miserably and then talk yourself out of doing it again. So if you commit to doing more than 1 at a time, like commit to doing like 12. Or like, whatever your number is that you have to, to get comfortable with that routine and that habit, then do that commitment. Jose: Like me, and I probably feel like, “All right, maybe a couple more out of this and I can start on my own channel too.” Tiffany: Yeah. Jose: Yeah. I mean it’s something you just have to do. Like, sometimes, I don’t know. For me, personally, I’ve always been a very shy person. I’ve always been, like, very to myself. Like, sure, I’d have friends, I’m the way how I am personally and still being cool and I’m just, you know, friendly with anyone. But I was always very shy so I was never out to just be like, “I can just do whatever I want, like, without caring.” But I ended up joining, like, a theater production in high school. So that really, like, brought a lot of, like, my personality out there. You know, I was able to do so much. Like I felt like I was so…the real me. But after that time, like, I don’t know, like, I think I slowed down. I think I got so serious with my work. I took a different path because before I wanted to actually get into acting for some time because of everything that I was doing, but then, I took a certain point of that program. I took into, like, writing and directing. So I was like, “No, this is what I want to do.” So when I started going to that path, like, I took myself too seriously with, like, my work and just keeping to myself in quiet. And then I felt like, “I’m starting to be, like, that shy person again.” Tiffany: Oh, yeah. Jose: So then I was like, “I know I can work on my own stuff if I could.” But then when you’re like, you get in front of the camera, when you try to work on your own stuff, you’re just like, “That was terrible.” Like, “I don’t want no one to watch me like the way I’m at them being myself like that.” Like, you just need to sometimes just go over and take a couple of tries. And once you get comfortable you’re just, like… You’ll know what to do. Tiffany: Yeah. Or what’s helped me a lot is going into things with that foresight already, that insight, already knowing that I’m going to judge myself. And so putting that voice to rest by already acknowledging it before I start. Jose: It makes sense. Yeah. Tiffany: Yeah. Because it’s tough. It’s tough for me too. We’re similar in that sense, too. Like I keep to myself a lot. Jose: Yeah. Yeah. Sometimes keeping to yourself a lot is obviously isn’t good because at one point you’re just like, and I don’t know, depending on who was around. Because, I mean, I was just telling you about the whole experience that I had in New York. Like, once I got, like, really mad. It’s like I was bottling so many feelings inside that, I don’t know. It was just, like, pop. And then I was just like, “I don’t like any of you guys. I’m leaving out of here.” Tiffany: Yeah, yeah. Yeah, it’s true. Anything else you want to share that you’ve learned along the way, or that would help anybody who’s listening, who wants to start either a podcast or a YouTube channel and like is having trouble navigating the back end? Jose: I think, I mean, this is an obvious, but a lot of us don’t always take this into consideration into, like, our actual daily work, take notes. Tiffany: Take notes. Jose: Take notes, because sometimes you need to go back into those notes to see, like, what you did wrong or what you can improve on it. Tiffany: How do you use your notes? Jose: Well, again, for like a lot of the mistakes that maybe you might have made or I’ll try to go back and see, like, how I can do a workaround for that. Tiffany: Okay. But, like, walk us through, like, a type of note that you would take. Let’s say I do an, “Um, okay.” Jose: Yeah, exactly. Tiffany: “Um, all right, here we go here.” Jose: Like that. Tiffany: What would you write down? Jose: So before, I mean, every episode I was trying to start writing certain amount of notes, just saying like, “Okay, well how can I work around these, like, ums?” Like, because I know I feel like I’m wasting too much time. Like, I can’t just keep editing out like every part that she’s saying like, “Um.” So, going back to certain episodes, I’d figured like, “Yeah. well, she’s saying one in every single episode, just cut it down.” Where it’s like, “Take a certain amount of them out.” But when you do that whole like, “Um…okay.” Like it comes into a natural feeling, like it sounds good. Like if you’re just saying, “Um” because, well, you’re trying…I don’t know, either you’re shy or you might be embarrassed. Not embarrassed, sorry. You might not be, like, there fully in your head thinking that, “This is the question I need to ask.” Some moments you would say, “Um… So, um… But, um…” Like, those times I know it’s like, “Okay, well, I can cut out so much.” But if it just sounds so natural or it just comes through the good conversation, then it’s just like, “All right, those are the things I need to leave so I don’t waste time.” So I mean those are like the, yeah, typical notes that I would just write down for that at least on that hand. And then again, because you did ask me for certain notes because on your end you wanted to make sure that you can improve on certain parts. Tiffany: Yeah. I’m always asking Jose like… So I give Jose chunks of work at a time and he, like, works through them and then he posts them. And when he works through a certain amount, and he sends me updates on a weekly basis on things that he worked on, and then I’ll text him and say, “Hey, with those videos, what needs to be improved so you can spend less time editing, or so that your job is easier to edit?” One, because, like, I’m really throwing a lot of work at him, and, two, because I don’t want him to be spending like 10 hours ripping his hair out, editing “ums” out, you know? Like, that’s not fun for you. I want you to have fun while you’re doing this. Jose: Yeah. Seeing in that part, too, it’s like, you know, I’m learning certain things. Like, you can even easily just put, like, a title onto our video slides. Like, you know, slap on “TedTV.” Like this is the episode. It could be so easy, but it seemed like, well, eventually we have to evolve. So it’s, like, I started to learn more on how I do these, like, animated titles, where it’s like, you know, like, appear and bounce off, or like things like that. So those are really the note takings that I started to take, because… Tiffany: Oh, that’s cool. Jose: …trust me, like, there’s been on some videos where, like, “Okay, I remember how to do it.” but then it’s like, I’ll come around next week to working on the next one to actually doing those parts, and I’m, like, “I’ve forgotten how to do it.” Because there are specific ways you have to it with like the programs in order to do it. So it’s, like, I’ll forget. Like, sometimes, I’ll work on something, and then while I’m half ways done, I try to test it out to see how it looks and realize I forgot to, like, press that button for it to activate. So now I have to start all over again. But again, yeah, note taking to go back on your notes that you can just practice till. Again, after a few times it was just… Tiffany: Cool. Was there anything else you want to share? Anything else you want to add? I actually think this is a really cool episode because, like I said at the beginning, like nobody really gives us behind the scenes info, usually. Jose: Yeah, true. Yeah, I’ve never… Not personally, I’ve never seen that before either, so this is cool. Tiffany: Yeah, fist bump. Jose: No, I mean, I don’t think there’s anything else I can really add to. I mean, like I said, note taking. I feel like that’s like another thing, is practice. I mean, make sure you just have everything ready to go. I feel like if you’re organized, have everything all in place, like, before you start, then everything follows smoothly, because if not, then you’re like, “Oh damn, like, I missed out on something. I’m missing something else.” And then you’ve got to go back and you’ve got to backtrack yourself. And it’s like, yeah, you’re just wasting time. Tiffany: So stay organized. Jose: Yeah. Because, I mean, personally for me it’s like, I don’t know if anyone else can feel the same way. You’re like…you gotta put yourself in that mindset once you start working. So it’s, like, once you’re there, you’re like on a go. And then something like just distracts you or just stops you for that moment, then it’s like, you know, you lose that focus and you feel like… Tiffany: Yeah, you lose your train of thought, you lose where you are, and what you were doing. Jose: Exactly. Tiffany: Yeah. So what do you do? Do you like board yourself up while you’re doing editing work? Do you work at night? How do you do it? What’s, like, your favorite thing to do for work on this type of stuff? Jose: Well, yeah, nighttime…you know, it really depends on my day, to be honest. I usually do try to work more at nighttime, but recently since I got back to LA, I have been working more in the mornings, which is nice because I never really thought that, like, just waking up, having, like, a good breakfast or something that you can just work easily right after that. I don’t know. I feel like, creatively, like, for me, I’ve always worked at nighttime. Especially, like, when I want to work on music, like I’d feel like I could stay another day, why don’t just do something that you love, something that you’re just like, “All right.” Like, I know… Like, I’m in that creative mindset now, but, I can just, like, go in. But again, since I guess now it’s like, this is, kind of like, something I’ve just been focusing on solely. So it feels more like, “Oh well, I’m not working on anything else except this kind of work.” So it just seems still surprising for me to feel like, “Oh, this is my work. Like this is my life work right now that I can just like wake up and do this.” So even then, I’m just like, “Cool. Ready to go.” Tiffany: Cool. All right. Well, we can always do an episode two, episode three. We’re going to keep adding to the content and the platforms. And Jose, like, this is his baby, basically. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: And like we’re going to have more episodes like this the more we learn. And we’re babies, too. Like, the more we learn and the more we find little tips and tricks that will help other people, we’ll continue to help out. Jose: Yeah. Tiffany: It’s been fun having you. Jose: Thank you. Likewise. Yeah. Tiffany: Thanks for doing this. Jose: Yeah. For sure. Tiffany: I know you’re not like in front of like… I don’t know. He’s like, “I’m kind of nervous.” Jose: I am. Tiffany: Don’t be nervous. Jose: Yeah. I mean, you know it’s so weird, too. Tiffany: You know your stuff. Jose: It’s so weird because I’ve been trying to work on my website. I actually do have my own website, like my own blog site, and I post every so often. And I’ve done one YouTube video that was just an unboxing. And I was like, “This was fun, but I feel weird, like, doing this.” Because I’m not used to it. Like, again, like you say, it’s good idea to do it a couple of times. Once you do it a couple of times, then you just, kind of, go for it. But sometimes you’re just, kind of, tired of your self and just be like, “Who cares what everyone thinks?” Just do it. Tiffany: Or we can put this on your website. Jose: Yeah, that’s true. Yeah. Tiffany: So now you have two. Jose: Yeah. That’s true. Tiffany: All right, cool. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you for all everything that you do. Like, I know that I just throw a lot of stuff at you and you’ve been handling it like a boss. So I really appreciate it. And if anybody needs help, Jose actually is taking clients. And we’ll put the show notes along with his links to his website and contact info. And he’s a total boss on all this editing and mixing stuff. So thank you so much Jose and… Jose: Thank you. Tiffany: …we’ll have you back again for round two. Jose: Pretty sure. Tiffany: Sometime. Jose: All right. Tiffany: All right. Jose: All right. Tiffany: Bye, guys. Jose: Bye. Tiffany: Hey guys, thank you so much for tuning in to “Posh Incredible Transformations.” Don’t forget to check us out on YouTube, we’re at Posh Incredible, and you could see all the videos there. They are pretty fun. Jose does a really good job in making things fun. That’s it, that’s all I’ve got to say. Also, tune in, like, go over to the website poshinc.com. We have updates on where we are going to be in the world. Heading to Australia soon doing some workshops there. And I am all over the United States, so stay tuned there. Also, we’re launching a new product soon, which is really exciting, so stay up to date. Join our newsletter, go to Posh Inc. And don’t forget to subscribe so you’re notified when we launch new content. Thanks so much again for tuning in and have a beautiful day.

 

Tiffany: Hey.

Jose: Hi.Tiffany: How’s it going? How was your lunch? How’s your falafel sandwich?

Jose: It was delicious.

Tiffany: Yeah, I mean, oh my gosh, I was so flipping hungry. No, the mic is
here.
Jose: Yeah. Or I can just hold it too.

Tiffany: If you want.

Jose: I’m not that special.

Tiffany: If you want to hold it, you can hold it. But what I’ve found is usually
guests move around a lot…

Jose: Yeah, I do.

Tiffany: …and they’re not cognizant of what they’re doing with their hands. And
so that’s why I give the guest the stand, because I know that I shouldn’t move
this around because it makes noise.

Jose: It’s true.

Tiffany: In the recording, you hear it, right?

Jose: I do.

Tiffany: When people move the mics.

Jose: It was just really funny because when I would hear that, I would think it
was actually the guest, but I realize now that it is you, because you’re the only
one holding the mic.

Tiffany: Well, I mean, no. When I do it, it is usually the guests.

Jose: Okay. Okay.

Tiffany: Because this is the first time that I brought the stand because I know…
Usually, when I do interviews, it’s either with the mic on the cam or before, I
had this, but I did this single one, right?

Jose: Uh-huh.

Tiffany: And that’s not good.

Jose: No.

Tiffany: So now that I have the two mics and stuff, like…

Jose: It works a lot better.

Tiffany: …it’s better to bring the stand so the thing doesn’t move.

Jose: Yeah, because that was the problem before, because when you would use
just this, you don’t know, like, who was, like, really hogging up like a portion of
the mic. So sometimes, like, you’d be loud, the other person wouldn’t be loud.
So it’d be confusing sometimes. And it’s only one file, but like this, it’s two
files. So if this person is, like, is too quiet, then I can always just raise up the
volume on their end.

Tiffany: That’s actually a really good tip for folks who are listening. We, kind
of, just started this because, like, we are testing the sound. And when we test
the sound, usually that already enters the conversation, and that’s how it
happened. So what we’re talking about is we’re using the Zoom H2 recorder.
And the Zoom comes with a mic, but Jose found it difficult to edit with a single
mic because when two people are talking, their sounds aren’t exactly matched.
So in the recording, it’s hard to get them matched because they didn’t start
matched. Now when you record with two different mics, like Jose, when he’s
editing, he could bring one person’s level up to match the other one, or reduce
the other person’s level to match the person who is softer or not as loud. And so
that’s what Jose was saying, like, something that we’ve learned is that we just
need two mics. People need to have their own mics.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: Unless, like, I have started using the camera with the… What is that
mic called?

Jose: The Rode.

iffany: The Rode. So in that case, what would happen? Like if we’re doing this
on the big camera with the Rode…

Jose: I should just keep it on one point because when you have it on the actual
top of the camera, it’s just focused into a certain level that’s just, whenever
someone’s talking, that’s it. I mean, sure, if someone gets loud they’re going to
get loud, but with the mic, it’s just like one side, one section. So it’s like if I’m
moving this way, it’s probably going to be picked up. It’s, like, it sounds pretty
off. But if I’m right in front of the mic, then you can hear it clear.

Tiffany: It would be cool if you didn’t edit that so people can hear if you didn’t
edit that out. Okay. So anyways, welcome to the podcast.

Jose: Thank you.

Tiffany: This is really interesting because I haven’t really heard of anybody
interviewing their own, like, back end or back of house…

Jose: That’s true.

Tiffany: …podcasts. So what Jose does is, and I’ll give you an intro just like I
give everybody else. But Jose is the person behind the scenes. He, like, makes
everything happen. He makes everything work. He does the editing, he does the
music, he does the mixing. He does, like, everything, Jose, like, the videos and
the audio. And so I really wanted to get into Jose’s head, because he is the one
that’s hit all of the bumps in the road in terms of trying to figure out how to get
this podcast up and running, or how to get the video…the YouTubes up and
running. And while he’s figuring that out, I’m figuring out how to be better for
you guys to look at. But Jose is the one that’s doing all, like, you know, the
really, really, really hard work. And so, I’m sure a lot of people want to start
podcasts, want to start YouTubes, and it’s, kind of, intimidating. Like, when I
gave you this project, was it intimidating?

Jose: It was because, I mean, when you work on personal stuff, you already
know what you personally want to do. But when you work on something like
this, it’s someone else’s project. I mean Tiffany has given me like creative
control on what to do with the videos and the podcasts. So usually like in
previous work, they’ll give you like a task sheet, and that task sheet will tell
you, “This is what I want you to do exactly.” Like pinpoint, pinpoint. Like from
that certain time point where they want you to edit, where they want you to cut.
So, like, this is always fun. Like when someone says to you, “All right, do
whatever you want.” Cool, that’s always great. But with this type of thing, it’s
like I only know you to a certain level. So you’re telling me, “Do what you want
to do.” Like, “Do what you can do with it.” It’s like, “Here’s the work, like, go
for it. Have fun.”
Then it’s like, “Okay, what can I do that I know that she’s going to be happy
with, that she can love?” So this experience has been awesome because I’ve
gotten to know you a lot more than I previously had. And it’s, kind of, weird
because Tiffany always does these, especially the videos, because the videos,
she always does sees these silly things just to warm up. So it, kind of, like
makes me feel like better. Like makes me feel, like, makes me feel like, “All
right, cool.” Like, I know what I’ve got to do now. Like, I know what I can use,
what I have to cut out, and like get me like pumped up. Like that gets me
pumped up to know, like, “All right, I’m working right now. This is what I’m
doing.” Like, “We’re good to go.”

Tiffany: I literally…like, what runs through my head when I’m doing those is,
“I’m paying Jose to watch me be a weirdo right now.” But you have to. So I
guess one thing is, like, I like… One, I think I said this in the podcast with Oz,
it’s, I have a hard time managing people. I want people to do what they do best,
which is why I brought Jose in for this project. Jose used to work in our
warehouse. He was, like, our warehouse manager. And he’s, like, probably one
of the best, easiest people that I’ve ever worked with. And I know that he loves
the video. I know that he loves the audio stuff. Like he’s the music guy. He was
always, you know, like editing videos in his free time, like working on his
projects. He went to school while he was working with us to, like, finish his
degree in, like, what is it, video editing?

Jose: Oh, this time around it was for audio engineering.

Tiffany: Audio engineering.

Jose: Yeah. I studied film-making before that, and I just love music so much
and I thought, like, “Well, you know, I should really polish up my skills and
just do that as… What else should I do, you know, just to keep myself busy?”
Tiffany: So this is what I love about Jose. He’s always looking to improve. So I
knew that you did video stuff. I didn’t know about the audio stuff, but
obviously, you’re qualified to do this. And I know that is what you enjoy doing.
So it’s like when I know that, I don’t want to micromanage you. I don’t want to
tell you like when to cut. And I do sometimes.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: Like, “Yo, we’ve got to cut this out.” But for the most part, also I
wanted to see where you were starting, what your starting point was.

Jose: Oh, okay.

Tiffany: How much direction you actually needed. Because I don’t want to, like,
lay it all on you mostly because I know you. We’ve developed, like, a
relationship in work over the past, like what? Like three years.

Jose: Three years?

Tiffany: You know, Outpost.

Jose: Oh yeah.

Tiffany: You were working with us in Outpost.

Jose: I was. Yeah, that’s how I started.

Tiffany: That was back in 2014.

Jose: Probably it was 2014 then. Yeah, because that’s how I came in.

Tiffany: Yeah.

Jose: Because of Outpost, so…

Tiffany: So you’ve actually worked on three different things with us. So I know
him work-wise. I know what he is capable of, I know how he works. So there’s
a development of trust there, and that’s why I gave you so much and the way
that I gave it to you.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: But like what difficulties did you come across? Like, let’s go with the
podcast first, because that’s where we started. I really put a lot on Jose. I was
like, “Hey, we’re going to start a podcast.” I asked you to register our business. I
gave you a bunch of content to edit. He had no idea what he was editing. He did
the music and he put it all together and he also does the posts. So that’s a lot of
work. And then I put the videos on him. So, like, once we got that rolling, the
podcast rolling was after what? Probably like four or five episodes, right?

Jose: Correct. Yeah.

Tiffany: Then I was like, “All right, here. Let’s do video now.”

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: And then that was, like, a whole another thing that we had to get up
and running. But let’s talk about the podcast first since it came first.

Jose: Sure.

Tiffany: Like, what were your biggest hurdles? What were the things that you
learned the most? Like, that would make your life easier now if you had to do it
again.

Jose: Well, I mean I think you’ve asked me a couple of times, too. Like
directions to on my end, to see like, “Oh, what do you need to do better?” Like,
“How should you use the mic better? How should you fix it in parts of the
recording device itself?” So one of the biggest things that I never really thought
about that I really have to go in depth was, when it comes to editing the
podcast, there’s a lot of parts… Or I didn’t mean that. I guess it’s normal for
everyone to be like, okay, when you’re doing an interview, you’re always going
to have these words that you always say, “Um.” The “Um” is a big thing that
you’re going to say.
So at the very beginning of those episodes, there was a lot of quiet moments but
a lot of, “Um…” And so it’s like, but then you’ll dive right into, like, the
conversation that we were just having. Because it sounded like you were
thinking of that question. Trying to go back into your head and think, like,
“What was I about to ask right now?” So that was always difficult at the
beginning, because yeah, I had to learn that I had to cut so much. So a lot of
time was spent on like, “Okay, I got to take out these.” Especially because, you
know, if they sound natural, sure, I’ll leave a couple of them. But otherwise that
episode would just be “um” left and right, like, every other minute. So that was
always, like, a difficult part because I’d have to, like, really go in there. And
especially when the “um” would probably be so long that it comes into the
question, I’d have to, like, really get in to it like a magnifying glass and just,
like, split it where it sounds like that never happened.

Tiffany: Okay. So if you’re looking to do audio and podcasting, then pay
attention to your own, I guess, transition words and how you use them. And a
pause would be better because it would make it easier for your editor to do that.
If you’re doing your own editing, it would make it easier for you too.

Jose: Of course. And I think the other part was because we were working… And
it’s not like we were working in the same room, like, we were working
remotely, so that’s…

Tiffany: I was in a different country.

Jose: Yeah. So it’d be difficult to just be like, “Hey, Tiffany, like, you messed
up right here. Can we like do this all over again at this moment?” Like that’s the
difference. Like right now what we’re doing here, it’s like, “Oh yeah, sure.” We
can be like, “All right, let’s do another tank.” Like, because I already know it
might come out right in the episode, but at that moment, at the beginning, that’s
what was the difficult part, because it’s like, all right, I got to work into this
because it is what I got. There’s no, like, re-dos right here, so I’ve got to work
the best that I can to make this sound good.

Tiffany: Yeah. You’re also very meticulous about things, though.

Jose: Yeah, yeah.

Tiffany: I would probably, like, not spend the time. And you, like, really get in
there. You’re like, “No, I have to make this like the best…”

Jose: Yeah, definitely.

Tiffany: “…that it can be.”

Jose: I am definitely like that. I’m very, very meticulous. Like, I want to make
sure everything is perfect. And I know things can’t always be perfect, but I try
to do my best to what it seems to be at least decent.

Tiffany: But that’s also in the Oz’s episode. That’s why one of the things that I
realized before I started making content that you didn’t realize was that, nobody
is going to listen to the first episodes.

Jose: Yeah, sure.

Tiffany: You just have to get the ball rolling. I think Jose spent like, you know,
really long time editing the episodes that, you know, they’re just, like, let’s call
those warmup episodes. Even though there’s like great content, I may end up
redoing that content again, just because, you know, we had to start somewhere.

Jose: It’s a learning step through everything, through this whole process of what
we were being working on together because it’s true. Like, now we’ve come to a
realization where it’s like, “Oh yeah. Who really might be watching or listening
to this stuff? So it doesn’t have to be completely perfect or that great.” So…

Tiffany: What other things have you learned along the way that would have
helped you like either do it faster, do it better, or, like, what other sticking
points where there that, like, major world learning opportunities or learning
curves, hurdles that you had to go through? What about with, like, the
applications?

Jose: Okay. The applications. I mean, well, because the applications are
something I already do know that I work on so that was… It had been a while
though, so I felt like at the beginning I was warming up into the application that
I was using to edit the podcasts. But I feel like it’s been something interesting
too because I never had to apply it for our podcast to be set up, so that was new.
Like I’ve always had that interest for my own personal work, but I’ve never
done it. So this was great to actually do all of this because I was able to learn a
lot to it. So as much as it took me some time, it’s like now I know how to do all
that stuff to just easily come about for whatever reason I always think to set up
some other show or something or…

Tiffany: What was the most difficult part about the applications? Was it just
having all of the information?

Jose: Yes, because a lot of applications, they want you to be very particular.
Like, you need to have everything set up like all ready to go. Like, you need to
have your artwork, there needs to be two specific types of sides for the artwork.
Obviously, having them in your show. You have to have a lot of metadata. So
you had to have also a description of your show, and you have to have… You
already had to have a certain amount of episodes, so even though it took us time
for those first couple of episodes, like, I had to dump all of that all at once. It
couldn’t just be, like, one episode. You could, but then it’s like, assuming from
what I read, it’s like they’ll listen to it and see like, “All right, you know, you’re
qualified, but if you have so many episodes, just to dump on there.” It’s like,
“Okay, cool.” The legit one I have, a podcast show, so they’re going to be
consistent.

Tiffany: So the major thing is just to make content?

Jose: Make content. That’s pretty much it. And I think because we’re still trying
to set up for Spotify, and like I mentioned before, it’s like Spotify, they’re very
particular because they have like a large base of people who just want to start a
show. Everyone wants to go on Sportify, because everyone uses Spotify,
everyone listens to Spotify. So it’s just much more difficult for you to get into it.
Actually, from what I read, it’s supposed to take about three months just to,
hopefully, get approved. And it’s not like they’re going to email you saying,
“Hey, you’re on Spotify now.” You’ll just show up, like, you’ll just pop up on
their Spotify servers. And then like, there, that’s it. But for them it seems like
you actually need to have, like, a following base. Like, you need to actually
have a certain amount of, like, a bunch of episodes. Unless again, like you
know somebody that can get you in, then I guess they make it easy on you.
But…

Tiffany: So if you’re thinking about starting a podcast, just start.

Jose: Yeah, definitely.

Tiffany: Don’t worry about the application. Like, make a few episodes and then
from there, like, the application sounds pretty easy.

Jose: Yeah. And then another thing is too, that a lot of the… Well, like, I know
with Apple podcasts and, like, Google Play, they’ll take you in, and they say
that you need to be active. Like you need to consistently be like dropping
episodes. They’re not specific, whether it’s like every week, every day, every
month, they’re just saying you should just be active. And that’s the other bad
part about Spotify, too. It’s, like, you really have to be active. If you’re not
active, it’s possibly they can just, like, bump you out.

Tiffany: Okay. So just because you get on Spotify doesn’t mean you’ll stay
there?

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: Is that what you’re saying?

Jose: Yeah, exactly.

Tiffany: Yeah. That makes sense.

Jose: I mean, we’re still waiting on that, so it’s like, once we get on that, I guess
we’ll see how that really works. But at least from what I read on their own, like,
on their back-end, that’s how it is, so…

Tiffany: And then what other platforms are we on?

Jose: Stitcher.

Tiffany: Stitcher? Okay.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: And was that similar to like iTunes?

Jose: That one was actually a little bit more, I guess, in a professional sense,
like more clean in that you actually had to submit an application. Like a legit
application saying we have to have a website already. You have to have certain
amount of episodes. Them, you did have to wait for an email to actually get
approved.

Tiffany: Okay.

Jose: So, yeah, that actually took a little bit more time. But still, I mean we got
in, but yeah, it took time. Versus Apple was all inclusive, like you just drop
everything in there, and that’s pretty much it. Actually, they have like a little
status bar to to show you like, “Oh hey, you’re approved or not.” Or like when
your application is rolling, so…

Tiffany: That’s cool.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: And then there’s also some Zoom settings, right?

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: Do we go over that in a video or anything?

Jose: No, we never have actually.

Tiffany: So, Jose will walk you through how to set up your Zoom. So, like, it’s
for what program? Like, what are your tools?

Jose: Well, okay. For me, for this, the way how this works, obviously you
choose the audio file that you want. So majority of the time, we always just
trying to save it as, like, a WAV file, W-A-V file, because it’s pretty universal.
Like any application you use will take it. And a lot of times it just depends on
like what ecosystem you have. Is it Apple or is it Mac…sorry, Microsoft?
Because there is always another file format that you can save. It’s called AIFF.
That one always saves a lot of like metadata information. It makes it a lot more
easier on you too, like, if you save everything correctly, like, when you dump it
into like the computer, it’s pretty much like all there. But we usually use WAV
just because it’s more universal.

Tiffany: It’s universal?

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: So tell us what your setup is. Like, what do you use for editing and all
of that stuff? Like music, audio, video editing. And then we’ll go through, like,
Zoom settings, and then we’ll go through camera settings.

Jose: Okay.

Tiffany: No, we won’t go through camera settings because we already did a
video on that.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: So we’ll go through Zoom settings.

Jose: Okay. Zoom settings.

Tiffany: No, no. Like, what do you use?

Jose: What do I use?

Tiffany: Tell us all your tools.

Jose: All my tools?

Tiffany: Yeah. What do you use for editing?

Jose: Oh, like the programs?

Tiffany: Like for creating, yeah.

Jose: Oh, okay. Well I usually use Final Cut Pro X.

Tiffany: What would you call these tools that you use? Programs?

Jose: Yeah. Programs. Yeah.

Tiffany: So when you’re talking to your editor… When you’re talking to your…What did Oz call you?

Jose: What did he call me?

Tiffany: Producer.

Jose: Producer. Yeah.

Tiffany: When you’re talking to your producer, don’t call things tools, call them
programs. What programs do you use, producer?

Jose: I usually just use Final Cut Pro X for video editing. I usually do also use
[inaudible 00:20:23].

Tiffany: What about for audio?

Jose: For audio, I use Logic Pro.

Tiffany: Okay.

Jose: Logic Pro X also.

Tiffany: And then on a daily basis when you’re doing work, like for us, what are
you using? What tools do you use?

Jose: Well, Tiffany, those are the programs I use with our project right now.
Like, normally I would use Pro tools for audio stuff. Our business of, like,
making music also for the show, it just makes it a lot more easier to use like
Logic Pro, just because… I mean, when I was in New York and I was making
all that stuff at first, I didn’t have like my guitar, like my bass. Like I had a
keyboard, that’s it. So it’s just more, everything is more inclusive with, like,
Logic was what I had there. Like it already has, like, its own little sound
programs in there, there are instrumental programs. So it was easy for me to
just, like, click, use whatever, and then apply it to whatever episode I’m
currently working on.

Tiffany: Okay. Also, Jose… Now, I’m self-conscious of all of my “ums.” Jose,
so when you do a podcast, you’re going to need an intro. So either that is an
intro to the podcast, a description, and you’re going to need… Like, if you’re
interviewing, you’ll need like an intro for the interview, either the person that
you’re interviewing. And then I started off with a list of questions, but I’ve kind
of gone to having an intention of who I want to interview, and then what I want
to get out of it or what I want…not me personally, but like what I want to bring
out of it. And then I, kind of, go with the flow through the interview and
questions. And then an outro, that could be like a sign-off or something. And
then a description in the show notes.
So what Jose does is, when he’s editing, he’ll make a list of all of the things that
we talk about over the interview, and then he’ll time stamp them, and then put
links to anything below. So he does all the posting and descriptions and stuff.
And what else did we have to figure out together? There were a lot of things
that we’ve like gone back and forth about like, there was the camera stuff, there
was the Zoom settings. Do you want me to go over your Zoom settings now?
Jose: Yeah, sure. I mean, it depends on what you working on, but if you’re
trying to start the podcast recordings, it usually is best to set it at a 44.1 kHertz.
That’s, like, the recording format you’re going to want to have it on versus the
file formatting, which is WAV, because it’s just the standard way to go when
you’re going to like stream audio anywhere. But when it comes to video though,
it works a little bit more differently. You usually end up going towards a 48… I
think I told you what it was. Yeah, 48 kHertz. It’s just the way how we were
taught.

Tiffany: That’s funny. Okay. So before I got the Rode mic, I was using the
Zoom to record audio, while I was using the camera to record video. And if
you’re going to match the audio and the video that way, then you need to the
settings on the Zoom to 48.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: What’s the difference in the sound?

Jose: Okay. Well, the high you actually go, the more information you actually
are recording. Like it’s… How can I explain it?

Tiffany: So it picks up more?

Jose: For example, okay, a picture. If you take a standard definition picture
versus a high definition picture, which is a lot better?

Tiffany: High def.

Jose: Exactly, the high definition picture. So the higher you actually go with the
actual recording format, the more information you get out of the recording.
How can I explain that more? There is just more detailed information on the
sound waves that you get, so…

Tiffany: How does that interpret audio?

Jose: Okay. So when we actually… Once we’re done with, like, the audio
project, whatever podcast episode that we we’re done, usually you have to save
that. So what I usually have to do is, I still save it as a WAV file and it’s still at
that high-resolution format. But it has to downsize to an MP3 format. So then
when I downsize into an MP3 format, it starts to lose all this information. So if
a symbol is like a certain way, how it sounds much more cleaner…

Tiffany: Oh.

Jose: …then when it starts to downsize, that symbol doesn’t sound…

Tiffany: It’s distorted.

Jose: It’s distorted.

Tiffany:See, this is a really good thing to know. So 44 is safe?

Jose: Yeah. I mean you can honestly go higher if you want to. The only reason
why we will try to keep it that way is because, well, how long do you think
you’re going to be working…I’d be working on this, like, episode? Like, it just
depends on your memory settings. Like, if you’re memory card only has a
certain way amount of, like, space in it, then that’s the reason why I will keep it.
Like that’s the standard for you to keep it up, for you to record it, but you can
go a lot more higher if you want. It’s like when I do my work from home, like
when I actually work on my own music, if I have to record stuff, I actually go at
96. That’s like three times…no, two times…yeah, two times.

Tiffany: Two. Yeah.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: Okay, why?

Jose: Just because you’re really ever going to record the best that you can from
that audio format. So then when you keep going down, again, once you go
down, like, when you do it to an MP3 format, it’ll probably sound just really
clean. And it’s a very interesting thing that a lot of people sometimes…
Obviously, if you didn’t really study it or you’re not into the whole recording
aspects of making music and stuff, you start to learn. That’s why there is a
whole debate on Apple Music because Apple has this thing of, “Oh, you can
download their stuff on, like, iTunes Plus.” Because it’s a higher quality
standard where it’ll sound like it’s coming out a CD, but yet it’s in an MP3 file
format.

Tiffany: Oh, interesting.

Jose: Yeah, that’s why a lot of people always say this all the time. If you talk to
old school people who are into CD collecting and all that stuff, that’s why all
for them stick to their CDs too because you get, like, the best audio quality out
of a CD. You still can now, not that you can’t. You can totally get the best audio
quality from digital. It’s just, you have to obviously download it to that file size.
And usually, like a full file size for like a 3-minute song or something like that
could be maybe about over a gigabyte versus like 30 megabytes or something.

Tiffany: Yeah. Does Tidal do that, too?

Jose: Yeah. Actually, that’s what Tidal was like trying to focus on. They were
trying to make it seem… HiFi is what they will call it for like the HiFi people
who want high fidelity in their audio. So that’s what their whole spiel was, is
that like, “Hey, we’re not sure we’re like other streaming service company, but
we have the HiFi where it’s like at the high def.”

Tiffany: Yeah.

Jose: So that’s what they usually do.

Tiffany: I mean, I don’t know if I can tell the difference, but I can definitely get
my dose of Jay Z on Tidal, and I can’t do that anywhere else, so…
Jose: Yeah. I mean, sure. I mean, like there’s a lot of people who go, like, really
with all that kind of stuff. Like sure, “We can just have a simple set of, like,
Apple headphones or just some Beats and we can probably…” I mean, if you
listen to that kind of stuff a lot, you’ll be able to tell it, but if you’re just like, “I
don’t care. Like I just want to listen to music.” But it’s not going to come… Like,
you can’t tell so much of a difference unless someone tells you like, “Hey, listen
to this one and then listen to this one, and tell me, like, which one sounds
better?” But again, people sometimes even spend, like, a crapload of money just
to have better headphones that aren’t going to give you that experience that you
want. Amplifiers, speakers, like different things, so…

Tiffany: Yeah. Actually, I can tell the difference in headphones.

Jose: Okay.

Tiffany: I just can’t tell the difference in apps.

Jose: Oh, okay. Yeah. See that’s the other thing, too. Here’s another thing that
you probably should know because sometimes a lot of these apps, you need to
switch your settings, too.

Tiffany: What?

Jose: Yeah. Sometimes you do. Like, Spotify, for a while…

Tiffany: Okay, so, like, what would the settings be?

Jose: Like, for Spotify before, like you actually had to go into your audio
playback settings and they’ll tell you the different types of MP3 formats you can
listen to. So it’d be like 128…

Tiffany: In your computer or in your phone?

Jose: In your phone.

Tiffany: There are audio playback settings in the phone?

Jose: Yeah. Every app that you use will have its own little settings, so you have
to actually go into it and tweak them. So it’s like Tidal. Like, from what I
remember, you do have to switch those settings, too. Like, if you pay for that
HiFi subscription, then you have to turn it on and be, like, “This is the format I
want to listen to it in.”

Tiffany: All right, after we’re done with this, I’ll drive me home, while you
change my settings, because I had no idea you can even change your audio
settings in your phone.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: That’s crazy. Okay, let’s go over just a couple of things. So if you’re
going to hire someone, be very specific about how you want your editing done.
I didn’t do that with Jose because I’ve worked with Jose before and I know he’s,
like sort of, on the same wavelength.

Jose: Mm-hmm.

Tiffany: Like, we’re not on the same wavelength, but you’re on… Like, you
know what you’re doing because you’ve done this for so long and it’s because,
like, your heart’s there.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: And so, like, that’s why I trust you, but if you’re going to hire
somebody to do your work and it’s not Jose, then you have to be… I’m hiring
people to do like, you know, the SEO stuff and the optimization, like, for
YouTubes and, like, descriptions. And as I’m talking to people, really not
everyone is ready to be there and understand exactly what you want and need.
They need to be told what to do.

Jose: Yeah. I mean, it’s like, this stuff now too. With the whole optimization
thing. Like, it’s all new to me. I mean, I’m learning from you. Like, you’re
giving me the definition of, like, “Hey, this is how you do it. This is how it’s
done.” So I mean, it’s always been interesting too. It’s just the fact like that it’s
this whole project has been, like, a learning step too. As much as the stuff that I
know, but the other things I don’t know, like, I’m learning. So it’s like, “Hey, I
know…” I can’t say, like, I’m, like, the best to do that specifically, but, “Hey, I’m
learning something new, and it’s just like a new skill.”

Tiffany: Yeah. I think in terms of optimization, I think it’s more of, like, the
way that I look at it is, it’s a way of thinking because you just have to think
about what other people are searching for so you could be there to capture
them, or you could be there when they search, when the search engine comes
up, you know? That’s how I think about optimization. I wouldn’t say, “I guess
it’s just trying to figure out what other people are looking for.”
Jose: It’s just very interesting to know, because, like, you think, like, “Oh yeah,
just search something online.” And it pumps up, so it’s like, “Oh cool. It’s just
there.” But you don’t really think and realize, “Oh well, there’s steps taken from
these websites or these people are doing that for them to be, like, at the top of
the list.” So it’s another…

Tiffany: You’re seeing it from a different perspective.

Jose: Yeah, yeah. I’m just seeing it from a different perspective.

Tiffany: Not only from, like, a searcher’s perspective, but you’re seeing it from
the other side.

Jose: Yeah, exactly.

Tiffany: Yeah. I actually think that’s valuable information to be able to have in
general, to see things from a new perspective.

Jose: It does. Because now once you learn that, that’s it. It’s, like, every day you
do something like that, whenever you go back to doing that, it’s like that’s the
way you see it. So it’s like, yeah, if I search for something, it’s, like, “Okay, let
me see. Let me look into more details about that.” So, it’s like, there’s a lot of
things that I feel like for me personally, it conflicts with my daily life. Not in a
bad way, but it’s, for example, yeah, when I finished off the whole audio
engineering program, it’s, like, that came more into a thing where it’s like,
“Okay, I pay attention a lot more movies.” Like if I’m watching a movie, it’s
like, “Oh, they made a mistake right there,” or, “That sound doesn’t sound
right.” I know that that’s probably how they did it. Sometimes you ruin things
for other people, especially if you’re talking out loud, you know?

Tiffany: I know exactly what you mean. Knowing things makes you appreciate
really good quality thoughtful things, right?

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: Because when you see something and you can also see the underside
of it, like the work that went into it, and the thought that went into it, you really
appreciate it.

Jose: Oh, for sure. Yes.

Tiffany: You’re automatically just like pulled to it. You’re like, “That’s good
stuff.” You know, there’s not a whole lot of good, like, things out there.

Jose: No. I mean, for example for me, since I’m a whole movie guy, that’s why
when a lot of people will say, “Oh this movie was terrible. It was bad.” It’s like,
“I don’t know.” I read a lot of critic reviews, especially also like on Rotten
Tomatoes, but just because something is fresh stamped doesn’t mean I’m
probably going to love it or I’m going to be like, “Okay, cool. Like, this is the
best movie ever.” Like, even if something is, like, that terribly bad, I’ll watch it
because I want to give them the benefit of the doubt because, yeah, they put the
work into it and, you know, you might not know what their whole, like, point of
what they were working on was supposed to be, so…

Tiffany: Yeah. Another reason why I’m also so hard on myself and it’s hard to
put out content that I also sometimes know isn’t that full, like, range of quality
that I appreciate, but, you know, at the same time, it’s like it takes a lot to get to
that point. And, you know, you and I both appreciate, like, good quality stuff,
and it’s, like, we’re just aiming to be that every single time, you know?

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: Or aiming to be a little closer to it every single time.

Jose: Yes.

Tiffany: Yeah. But it’s tough also for people like us because it’s tough to start
something knowing that it won’t be there when we start, right?

Jose: Yes. And that’s a good way to put things. That sometimes, for me being,
again, meticulous, I, for years, would always feel, like, “Oh, I need to have this
equipment, this is exact item. I need to have this exact program. I need to be in
this mindset.” Sometimes you just have to tell yourself, like, “No, just do it. Just
go for it. Work with what you have.”

Tiffany: Yeah. I love that.

Jose: So…

Tiffany: Work with what you have. And if you really need something more
later down the road, like get it.

Jose: Yeah, exactly. Then, again, you don’t know who’s going to listen or watch
your content, but either way it’s a practice. It’s a practice for you to improve on
your own self. So if you just want to do something, you just have to go over it. I
mean sometimes I feel like you have to be in the right mindset just to do it
because that’s the only way how you can feel you can do it, but you just need
that extra push from somebody to just be like, “No, go for it and do it.” Because
once you do it, you’re in there, you’re good. Like, you can go from there.
Tiffany: Yeah. I think, along the same lines, I think it’s good to commit to doing
it more than once, too.

Jose: True. Yeah.

Tiffany: Because you could go do it and then fail miserably and then talk
yourself out of doing it again.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: So if you commit to doing more than 1 at a time, like commit to doing
like 12.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: Or like, whatever your number is that you have to, to get comfortable
with that routine and that habit, then do that commitment.
Jose: Like me, and I probably feel like, “All right, maybe a couple more out of
this and I can start on my own channel too.”

Tiffany: Yeah.

Jose: Yeah. I mean it’s something you just have to do. Like, sometimes, I don’t
know. For me, personally, I’ve always been a very shy person. I’ve always been,
like, very to myself. Like, sure, I’d have friends, I’m the way how I am
personally and still be cool and I’m just, you know, friendly with anyone. But I
was always very shy so I was never out to just be like, “I can just do whatever I
want, like, without caring.” But I ended up joining, like, a theater production in
high school. So that really, like, brought a lot of, like, my personality out there.
You know, I was able to do so much. Like I felt like I was so…the real me. But
after that time, like, I don’t know, like, I think I slowed down. I think I got so
serious with my work. I took a different path because before I wanted to
actually get into acting for some time because of everything that I was doing,
but then, I took a certain point of that program. I took into, like, writing and
directing. So I was like, “No, this is what I want to do.” So when I started going
to that path, like, I took myself too seriously with, like, my work and just
keeping to myself in quiet. And then I felt like, “I’m starting to be, like, that shy
person again.”

Tiffany: Oh, yeah.

Jose: So then I was like, “I know I can work on my own stuff if I could.” But
then when you’re like, you get in front of the camera, when you try to work on
your own stuff, you’re just like, “That was terrible.” Like, “I don’t want no one
to watch me like the way I’m at them being myself like that.” Like, you just
need to sometimes just go over and take a couple of tries. And once you get
comfortable you’re just, like… You’ll know what to do.

Tiffany: Yeah. Or what’s helped me a lot is going into things with that foresight
already, that insight, already knowing that I’m going to judge myself. And so
putting that voice to rest by already acknowledging it before I start.

Jose: It makes sense. Yeah.

Tiffany: Yeah. Because it’s tough. It’s tough for me too. We’re similar in that
sense too. Like I keep to myself a lot.

Jose: Yeah. Yeah. Sometimes keeping to yourself a lot is obviously isn’t good
because at one point you’re just like, and I don’t know, depending on who was
around. Because, I was just telling you about the whole experience that I had in
New York. Like, once I got, like, really mad. It’s like I was bottling so many
feelings inside that, I don’t know. It was just, like, pop. And then I was just like,
“I don’t like any of you guys. I’m leaving out of here.”

Tiffany: Yeah, yeah. Yeah, it’s true. Anything else you want to share that you’ve
learned along the way, or that would help anybody who’s listening, who wants
to start either a podcast or a YouTube channel and like is having trouble
navigating the back end?

Jose: I think, I mean, this is an obvious, but a lot of us don’t always take this
into consideration into, like, our actual daily work, take notes.

Tiffany: Take notes.

Jose: Take notes, because sometimes you need to go back into those notes to
see, like, what you did wrong or what you can improve on it.

Tiffany: How do you use your notes?

Jose: Well, again, for like a lot of the mistakes that maybe you might have
made or I’ll try to go back and see, like, how I can do a workaround for that.

Tiffany: Okay. But, like, walk us through, like, a type of note that you would take. Let’s say I do an, “Um, okay.”

Jose: Yeah, exactly.

Tiffany: “Um, all right, here we go here.”

Jose: Like that.

Tiffany: What would you write down?

Jose: So before, I mean, every episode I was trying to start writing certain
amount of notes, just saying like, “Okay, well how can I work around these,
like, ums?” Like, because I know I feel like I’m wasting too much time. Like, I
can’t just keep editing out like every part that she’s saying like, “Um.” So, going
back to certain episodes, I’d figured like, “Yeah. well, she’s saying one in every
single episode, just cut it down.” Where it’s like, “Take a certain amount of
them out.” But when you do that whole like, “Um…okay.” Like it comes into a
natural feeling, like it sounds good. Like if you’re just saying, “Um” because,
well, you’re trying…I don’t know, either you’re shy or you might be
embarrassed. Not embarrassed, sorry. You might not be, like, there fully in your
head thinking that, “This is the question I need to ask.” Some moments you
would say, “Um… So, um… But, um…” Like, those times I know it’s like,
“Okay, well, I can cut out so much.” But if it just sounds so natural or it just
comes through the good conversation, then it’s just like, “All right, those are the
things I need to leave so I don’t waste time.” So I mean those are like the, yeah,
typical notes that I would just write down for that at least on that hand. And
then again, because you did ask me for certain notes because on your end you
wanted to make sure that you can improve on certain parts.

Tiffany: Yeah. I’m always asking Jose like… So I give Jose chunks of work at a
time and he, like, works through them and then he posts them. And when he
works through a certain amount, and he sends me updates on a weekly basis on
things that he worked on, and then I’ll text him and say, “Hey, with those
videos, what needs to be improved so you can spend less time editing, or so that
your job is easier to edit?” One, because, like, I’m really throwing a lot of work
at him, and, two, because I don’t want him to be spending like 10 hours ripping
his hair out, editing “ums” out, you know? Like, that’s not fun for you. I want
you to have fun while you’re doing this.

Jose: Yeah. Seeing in that part too, it’s like, you know, I’m learning certain
things. Like, you can even easily just put, like, a title onto our video slides.
Like, you know, slap on “TedTV.” Like this is the episode. It could be so easy,
but it seemed like, well, eventually we have to evolve. So it’s, like, I started to
learn more on how I do these, like, animated titles, where it’s like, you know,
like, appear and bounce off, or like things like that. So those are really the note
takings that I started to take, because…

Tiffany: Oh, that’s cool.

Jose: …trust me, like, there’s been on some videos where, like, “Okay, I
remember how to do it.” but then it’s like, I’ll come around next week to
working on the next one to actually doing those parts, and I’m, like, “I’ve
forgotten how to do it.” Because there are specific ways you have to it with like
the programs in order to do it. So it’s, like, I’ll forget. Like, sometimes, I’ll work
on something, and then while I’m half ways done, I try to test it out to see how
it looks and realize I forgot to, like, press that button for it to activate. So now I
have to start all over again. But again, yeah, note taking to go back on your
notes that you can just practice till. Again, after a few times it was just…
Tiffany: Cool. Was there anything else you want to share? Anything else you
want to add? I actually think this is a really cool episode because, like I said at
the beginning, like nobody really gives us behind the scenes info, usually.
Jose: Yeah, true. Yeah, I’ve never… Not personally, I’ve never seen that before
either, so this is cool.

Tiffany: Yeah, fist bump.

Jose: No, I mean, I don’t think there’s anything else I can really add to. I mean,
like I said, note taking. I feel like that’s like another thing, is practice. I mean,
make sure you just have everything ready to go. I feel like if you’re organized,
have everything all in place, like, before you start, then everything follows
smoothly, because if not, then you’re like, “Oh damn, like, I missed out on
something. I’m missing something else.” And then you’ve got to go back and
you’ve got to backtrack yourself. And it’s like, yeah, you’re just wasting time.

Tiffany: So stay organized.

Jose: Yeah. Because, I mean, personally for me it’s like, I don’t know if anyone
else can feel the same way. You’re like…you gotta put yourself in that mindset
once you start working. So it’s, like, once you’re there, you’re like on a go. And
then something like just distracts you or just stops you for that moment, then it’s
like, you know, you lose that focus and you feel like…

Tiffany: Yeah, you lose your train of thought, you lose where you are, and what
you were doing.

Jose: Exactly.

Tiffany: Yeah. So what do you do? Do you like board yourself up while you’re
at doing editing work? Do you work at night? How do you do it? What’s, like,
your favorite thing to do for work on this type of stuff?
Jose: Well, yeah, nighttime…you know, it really depends on my day, to be
honest. I usually do try to work more at nighttime, but recently since I got back
to LA, I have been working more in the mornings, which is nice because I
never really thought that, like, just waking up, having, like, a good breakfast or
something that you can just work easily right after that. I don’t know. I feel like,
creatively, like, for me, I’ve always worked at nighttime. Especially, like, when
I want to work on music, like I’d feel like I could stay another day, why don’t
just do something that you love, something that you’re just like, “All right.”
Like, I know… Like, I’m in that creative mindset now, but, I can just, like, go in.
But again, since I guess now it’s like, this is, kind of like, something I’ve just
been focusing on solely. So it feels more like, “Oh well, I’m not working on
anything else except this kind of work.” So it just seems still surprising for me
to feel like, “Oh, this is my work. Like this is my life work right now that I can
just like wake up and do this.” So even then, I’m just like, “Cool. Ready to go.”

Tiffany: Cool. All right. Well, we can always do an episode, two episodes,
three. We’re going to keep adding to the content and the platforms. And Jose,
like, this is his baby, basically.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: And like we’re going to have more episodes like this the more we
learn. And we’re babies, too. Like, the more we learn and the more we find little
tips and tricks that will help other people, we’ll continue to help out.

Jose: Yeah.

Tiffany: It’s been fun having you.

Jose: Thank you. Likewise. Yeah.

Tiffany: Thanks for doing this.

Jose: Yeah. For sure.

Tiffany: I know you’re not like in front of like… I don’t know. He’s like, “I’m
kind of nervous.”

Jose: I am.

Tiffany: Don’t be nervous.

Jose: Yeah. I mean, you know it’s so weird, too.

Tiffany: You know your stuff.

Jose: It’s so weird because I’ve been trying to work on my website. I actually do
have my own website, like my own blog site, and I post every so often. And
I’ve done one YouTube video that was just an unboxing. And I was like, “This
was fun, but I feel weird, like, doing this.” Because I’m not used to it. Like,
again, like you say, it’s good idea to do it a couple of times. Once you do it a
couple of times, then you just, kind of, go for it. But sometimes you’re just, kind
of, tired of your self and just be like, “Who cares what everyone thinks?” Just
do it.

Tiffany: Or we can put this on your website.

Jose: Yeah, that’s true. Yeah.

Tiffany: So now you have two.

Jose: Yeah. That’s true.

Tiffany: All right, cool. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you for all
everything that you do. Like, I know that I just throw a lot of stuff at you and
you’ve been handling it like a boss. So I really appreciate it. And if anybody
needs help, Jose actually is taking clients. And we’ll put the show notes along
with his links to his website and contact info. And he’s a total boss on all this
editing and mixing stuff. So thank you so much Jose and…

Jose: Thank you.

Tiffany: …we’ll have you back again for round two.

Jose: Pretty sure.

Tiffany: Sometime.

Jose: All right.

Tiffany: All right.

Jose: All right.

Tiffany: Bye, guys.

Jose: Bye.

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